Articles Posted in Divorce Cases

During a divorce, coming to an agreement about custodial arrangements is often one of the most hotly contested issues between parties. Moreover, when subsequent changes need to be made to custodial arrangements because of changes in circumstances, things can get just as messy as they were when the arrangements were made in the first place. Before pursuing such changes, it is always important to consult with an experienced New Jersey family law attorney to ensure that you know your rights.

In a recent Superior Court of New Jersey Appellate Division decision, the court had to consider whether the defendant (Mother) would be allowed to take her children to visit extended family given their original custodial agreement. In the case at hand, the Mother moved to change her parenting time schedule so that she could bring their children to see their paternal grandparents. The plaintiff (Father) sought to restrain the Mother from doing this. The lower court sided with Father and denied Mother’s motion for reconsideration.

On appeal, the court stated that a party seeking to modify custody must demonstrate that the changed circumstances affect the welfare of the children. Furthermore, the appellate court found that the lower court erred in denying Mother an opportunity for reconsideration because she had met all of the requirements necessary for requesting a change by demonstrating a change in circumstances that would affect the welfare of her children. Because Mother demonstrated a change in circumstances, and Father failed to put forward credible reasons to bar his children from seeing their grandparents, the appellate court reversed the lower court’s decision.

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In a recent case before a New Jersey appeals court, the court considered whether the wife was entitled to the gains and losses on her share of the husband’s 401(k) from the date of the filing of the complaint until the date of distribution. In this New Jersey divorce case, the parties had been married for twenty-seven years before the wife filed for divorce. The parties agreed to have their disputed issues resolved through arbitration and mediation.

Through mediation, the parties reached an agreement on their disputed issues, and the arbitrator prepared a memorandum of understanding, which both parties signed. In the agreement, the parties agreed that the wife would receive half of the husband’s 401(k) balance, which was approximately $340,000. The parties agreed that the $170,000 would be applied to the husband’s equitable distribution obligation.

The wife later argued that she was entitled to the gains and losses on her share of the 401(k) account from the filing of the complaint until the date of distribution. The trial court disagreed, finding she was not entitled to the gains and losses, and she appealed. The appeals court agreed with the trial court, finding that the memorandum of understanding was clear regarding the distribution of the 401(k) account. It clearly stated that the wife was entitled to half of the account—$170,000. It also said that the sum would be paid by the husband towards the plaintiff’s share of the equitable distribution. There was no reference to the wife’s entitlement to credits or debits for any market fluctuations. It was also unnecessary to establish a formula to allocate shares because the parties had agreed on the amount of the wife’s share. Thus, the court found that the wife was not entitled to the gains and losses after the filing of the divorce complaint.

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